Word of the Year Our Word of the Year choice serves as a symbol of each year’s most meaningful events and lookup trends. It is an opportunity for us to reflect mitutoyo inside micrometer catalogue pdf the language and ideas that represented each year. So, take a stroll down memory lane to remember all of our past Word of the Year selections. Change It wasn’t trendy, funny, nor was it coined on Twitter, but we thought change told a real story about how our users defined 2010.

The national debate can arguably be summarized by the question: In the past two years, has there been enough change? Meanwhile, many Americans continue to face change in their homes, bank accounts and jobs. Only time will tell if the latest wave of change Americans voted for in the midterm elections will result in a negative or positive outcome. Tergiversate This rare word was chosen to represent 2011 because it described so much of the world around us. Tergiversate means “to change repeatedly one’s attitude or opinions with respect to a cause, subject, etc. Bluster In a year known for the Occupy movement and what became known as the Arab Spring, our lexicographers chose bluster as their Word of the Year for 2012. 2012 saw the most expensive political campaigns and some of the most extreme weather events in human history, from floods in Australia to cyclones in China to Hurricane Sandy and many others.

Privacy We got serious in 2013. Privacy was on everyone’s mind that year, from Edward Snowden’s reveal of Project PRISM to the arrival of Google Glass. Exposure Spoiler alert: Things don’t get less serious in 2014. Our Word of the Year was exposure, which highlighted the year’s Ebola virus outbreak, shocking acts of violence both abroad and in the US, and widespread theft of personal information. From the pervading sense of vulnerability surrounding Ebola to the visibility into acts of crime or misconduct that ignited critical conversations about race, gender, and violence, various senses of exposure were out in the open this year. Identity Fluidity of identity was a huge theme in 2015.

Language around gender and sexual identity broadened, becoming more inclusive with additions to the dictionary like gender-fluid as well as the gender-neutral prefix Mx. Xenophobia In 2016, we selected xenophobia as our Word of the Year. Fear of the “other” was a huge theme in 2016, from Brexit to President Donald Trump’s campaign rhetoric. Despite being chosen as the 2016 Word of the Year, xenophobia is not to be celebrated. Rather it’s a word to reflect upon deeply in light of the events of the recent past. Complicit The word complicit sprung up in conversations in 2017 about those who spoke out against powerful figures and institutions and about those who stayed silent.

It was a year of real awakening to complicity in various sectors of society, from politics to pop culture. Our choice for Word of the Year is as much about what is visible as it is about what is not. It’s a word that reminds us that even inaction is a type of action. The silent acceptance of wrongdoing is how we’ve gotten to this point. We must not let this continue to be the norm. If we do, then we are all complicit.

We’re Never Mercurial With Your Word Of The Day Quiz! Quiz Yourself: Can You Tell Good Luck From Bad? Our Shangri-la Is A New Word Of The Day Quiz! Start your day with weird words, fun quizzes, and language stories.

This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged. This iframe contains the logic required to handle Ajax powered Gravity Forms. It is used in many fields such as mechanical engineering, metalworking, forestry, woodworking, science and medicine. A plurale tantum sense of the word “calipers” coexists in natural usage with the regular noun sense of “caliper”. That is, sometimes a caliper is treated cognitively like a pair of glasses or a pair of scissors, resulting in a phrase such as “hand me those calipers” or “those calipers are mine” in reference to one unit. Also existing colloquially but not in formal usage is referring to a vernier caliper as a “vernier” or a “pair of verniers”. In imprecise colloquial usage, some speakers extend this even to dial calipers, although they involve no vernier scale.

In machine-shop usage, the term “caliper” is often used in contradistinction to “micrometer”, even though outside micrometers are technically a form of caliper. The earliest caliper has been found in the Greek Giglio wreck near the Italian coast. The ship find dates to the 6th century BC. The wooden piece already featured a fixed and a movable jaw.

A bronze caliper, dating from 9 AD, was used for minute measurements during the Chinese Xin dynasty. The caliper had an inscription stating that it was “made on a gui-you day at new moon of the first month of the first year of the Shijian guo period. The calipers included a “slot and pin” and “graduated in inches and tenths of an inch. The modern vernier caliper, reading to thousandths of an inch, was invented by American Joseph R. It was the first practical tool for exact measurements that could be sold at a price within the reach of ordinary machinists. The inside calipers are used to measure the internal size of an object.

Fine setting of this caliper type is performed by tapping the caliper legs lightly on a handy surface until they will almost pass over the object. A light push against the resistance of the central pivot screw then spreads the legs to the correct dimension and provides the required, consistent feel that ensures a repeatable measurement. The lower caliper in the image has an adjusting screw that permits it to be carefully adjusted without removal of the tool from the workpiece. Outside calipers are used to measure the external size of an object. The same observations and technique apply to this type of caliper, as for the above inside caliper. With some understanding of their limitations and usage, these instruments can provide a high degree of accuracy and repeatability. They are especially useful when measuring over very large distances, consider if the calipers are used to measure a large diameter pipe.

In the metalworking field, a divider caliper, popularly called a compass, is used in the process of marking out locations. A divider caliper is also used to measure a distance between two points on a map. The two caliper’s ends are brought to the two points whose distance is being measured. The caliper’s opening is then either measured on a separate ruler and then converted to the actual distance, or it is measured directly on a scale drawn on the map. Dividers are also used in the medical profession.

News Reporter